21 January 2017

Reconciliation, Goodwill and Honor

The Historian left DC this weekend in favor of visiting historical sites.  Today he was in Appomattox, where, after losing a battle against Lt. General Grant, General Lee signed documents of surrender that effectively ended the American Civil War.  I'm posting some of his remarks and photos here with permission.  

Appropriate today of all days, Appomattox County Courthouse National Historical Park continues to stand as a testament to the ideals of national reconciliation, goodwill, and honor and respect for others.  It marked the end of a devastating conflict, and was the first step in the reconstruction of a divided nation and the passage of the 14th and 15th amendments, which established the basis of racial equality in the United States.  A goal we still strive for.



The Peers House. Some of the last shots of the conflict were fired from the house's front yard.

The McLean House where General Robert E. Lee negotiated the surrender of the Confederate Army of Northern Virginia to General Ulysses S. Grant on April 9, 1865.

Slave quarters behind the McLean House. The Mclean's had as many as 15 or more slaves. He was a wealthy sugar importer.

A replica of the desk where General Grant wrote out the terms of the surrender.

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